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  • An Anthropology of Landscape

    Christopher Tilley and Kate Cameron-Daum | February 2017

    An Anthropology of Landscape tells the fascinating story of a heathland landscape in south-west England and the way different individuals and groups engage with it. Based on a long-term anthropological study, the book emphasises four individual themes: embodied identities, the landscape as a sensuous material form that is acted upon and in turn acts on people, the landscape as contested, and its relation to emotion. The landscape is discussed in relation to these themes as both ‘taskscape’ and ‘leisurescape’, and from the perspective of different user groups. First, those who manage the landscape and use it for work: conservationists, environmentalists, archaeologists, the Royal Marines, and quarrying interests. Second, those who use it in their leisure time: cyclists and horse riders, model aircraft flyers, walkers, people who fish there, and artists who are inspired by it. The book makes an innovative contribution to landscape studies and will appeal to all those intereste

    Edited Collection Anthropology Archaeology Social Sciences
  • Suburban Urbanities

    Edited by Laura Vaughan | November 2015

    Suburban space has traditionally been understood as a formless remnant of physical city expansion, without a dynamic or logic of its own. Suburban Urbanities challenges this view by defining the suburb as a temporally evolving feature of urban growth.

    Edited Collection Built Environment
  • Visualising Facebook

    Daniel Miller and Jolynna Sinanan | March 2017

    Since the growth of social media, human communication has become much more visual. This book presents a scholarly analysis of the images people post on a regular basis to Facebook. By including hundreds of examples, readers can see for themselves the differences between postings from a village north of London, and those from a small town in Trinidad. Why do women respond so differently to becoming a mother in England from the way they do in Trinidad? How are values such as carnival and suburbia expressed visually? Based on an examination of over 20,000 images, the authors argue that phenomena such as selfies and memes must be analysed in their local context. The book aims to highlight the importance of visual images today in patrolling and controlling the moral values of populations, and explores the changing role of photography from that of recording and representation, to that of communication, where an image not only documents an experience but also enhances it, making the moment

    Monograph Anthropology cultural-studies internet-studies popular-culture Social Sciences Sociology
  • The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology: Characters and Collections

    Edited by Alice Stevenson | June 2015

    The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology first opened its doors in 1915, and since then has attracted visitors from all over the world as well as providing valuable teaching resources. Named after its founder, the pioneering archaeologist Flinders Petrie, the Museum holds more than 80,000 objects and is one of the largest and finest collections of Egyptian and Sudanese archaeology in the world. Richly illustrated and engagingly written, the book moves back and forth between recent history and the ancient past, between objects and people. Experts discuss the discovery, history and care of key objects in the collections such as the Koptos lions and Roman era panel portraits. The rich and varied history of the Petrie Museum is revealed by the secrets that sit on its shelves.

    Edited Collection Archaeology UCL Museums and Collections
  • How the World Changed Social Media

    Daniel Miller et al | February 2016

    How the World Changed Social Media is the first book in Why We Post, a book series that investigates the findings of anthropologists who each spent 15 months living in communities across the world. This book offers a comparative analysis summarising the results of the research and explores the impact of social media on politics and gender, education and commerce. What is the result of the increased emphasis on visual communication? Are we becoming more individual or more social? Why is public social media so conservative? Why does equality online fail to shift inequality offline? How did memes become the moral police of the internet?

    Monograph Anthropology Social Sciences Sociology
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  • Landscape in the Longue Durée

    Christopher Tilley | August 2017

    Landscape in the Longue Durée is a 4000 year history of pebbles from the Bronze Age to the twenty-first century. Based on the results of a four-year archaeological excavation of a unique landscape in the UK consisting entirely of pebbles, the book argues that pebbles are like no other kind of stone – they occupy an especial place both in the prehistoric past and in our contemporary culture. Christopher Tilley asks that we re-think long-term continuity and change in a radically new way by considering embodied relations between people, things and landscapes in relation to the temporalizing practices of people in particular social and historical circumstances. The time of the past and that of the present can be considered to be coeval, and outside a chronological spatialized and homogeneous notion of time.

    Edited Collection Poetry Anthropology Archaeology Conservation Heritage Environment Earth Sciences Environment geography
  • An Anthropology of Landscape

    Christopher Tilley and Kate Cameron-Daum | February 2017

    An Anthropology of Landscape tells the fascinating story of a heathland landscape in south-west England and the way different individuals and groups engage with it. Based on a long-term anthropological study, the book emphasises four individual themes: embodied identities, the landscape as a sensuous material form that is acted upon and in turn acts on people, the landscape as contested, and its relation to emotion. The landscape is discussed in relation to these themes as both ‘taskscape’ and ‘leisurescape’, and from the perspective of different user groups. First, those who manage the landscape and use it for work: conservationists, environmentalists, archaeologists, the Royal Marines, and quarrying interests. Second, those who use it in their leisure time: cyclists and horse riders, model aircraft flyers, walkers, people who fish there, and artists who are inspired by it. The book makes an innovative contribution to landscape studies and will appeal to all those intereste

    Edited Collection Anthropology Archaeology Social Sciences
  • Social Media in Industrial China

    Xinyuan Wang | September 2016

    Described as the biggest migration in human history, an estimated 250 million Chinese people have left their villages in recent decades to live and work in urban areas. Xinyuan Wang spent 15 months living among a community of these migrants in a small factory town in southeast China to track their use of social media. It was here she witnessed a second migration taking place: a movement from offline to online. As Wang argues, this is not simply a convenient analogy but represents the convergence of two phenomena as profound and consequential as each other, where the online world now provides a home for the migrant workers who feel otherwise ‘homeless’.

    Monograph Anthropology internet-studies Social Sciences Sociology
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