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1 - 10 of 109 search results for !padrenullquery -UclAudience:staff -UclAudience:students UclOrgUnit:"UCL News"

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  1. Seismic imaging technology could deliver detailed images of the brain …

    https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/2020/mar/seismic-imaging-technology-could-deliver-detailed-images-brain

    6 Mar 2020: Scientists at UCL and Imperial College London have developed a new computational technique that could lead to fast, finely detailed brain imaging with a compact device that uses only sound waves.

    Scientists at UCL and Imperial College London have developed a new computational technique that could lead to fast, finely detailed brain imaging with a compact device that uses only sound waves.

  2. People affected by rare dementias help design digital support…

    https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/2020/feb/people-affected-rare-dementias-help-design-digital-support-platform

    28 Feb 2020: Clinicians and neuroscientists have been working with people living with rare dementias, and their carers and families, to design an innovative new online support platform, as part of the UCL-led Rare Dementia Support service.

    Clinicians and neuroscientists have been working with people living with rare dementias, and their carers and families, to design an innovative new online support platform, as part of the UCL-led Rare Dementia Support service.

  3. Iron in brain shows cognitive decline in people with Parkinson’s |…

    https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/2020/feb/iron-brain-shows-cognitive-decline-people-parkinsons

    21 Feb 2020: A cutting-edge MRI technique to detect iron deposits in different brain regions can track declines in thinking, memory and movement in people with Parkinson’s disease, finds a new UCL-led study.

    A cutting-edge MRI technique to detect iron deposits in different brain regions can track declines in thinking, memory and movement in people with Parkinson’s disease, finds a new UCL-led study.

  4. Mental health exhibition showcases art co-developed by…

    https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/2020/feb/mental-health-exhibition-showcases-art-co-developed-neuroscientists-and-artists

    21 Feb 2020: Artworks co-produced by neuroscientists and artists, which explore labels associated with mental health, such as stress and mood, are going on show beginning today as part of a series of events organised by UCL.

    Artworks co-produced by neuroscientists and artists, which explore labels associated with mental health, such as stress and mood, are going on show beginning today as part of a series of events organised by UCL.

  5. Cough syrup drug being trialled as Parkinson’s treatment | UCL News - …

    https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/2020/feb/cough-syrup-drug-being-trialled-parkinsons-treatment

    14 Feb 2020: After finding that a drug found in cough syrups may have use as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease, UCL researchers have received funding for the next stage in clinical trials.

    After finding that a drug found in cough syrups may have use as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease, UCL researchers have received funding for the next stage in clinical trials.

  6. Analysis: Is love just a fleeting high fuelled by brain chemicals? |…

    https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/2020/feb/analysis-love-just-fleeting-high-fuelled-brain-chemicals

    14 Feb 2020: Attempts to reduce love down to one simple cause, whether pheromones or fate, are misguided and romantic love is more complex than simple science, explains Professor Parashkev Nachev (UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology).

    Attempts to reduce love down to one simple cause, whether pheromones or fate, are misguided and romantic love is more complex than simple science, explains Professor Parashkev Nachev (UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology).

  7. Global initiative to use wearables to revolutionise disease detection …

    https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/2020/feb/global-initiative-use-wearables-revolutionise-disease-detection

    11 Feb 2020: A global initiative involving UCL researchers will be using wearable technology, such as wristbands and mobile apps, to revolutionise the early detection of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

    A global initiative involving UCL researchers will be using wearable technology, such as wristbands and mobile apps, to revolutionise the early detection of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

  8. Analysis: UCL study finds specific genes which affect learning…

    https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/2020/jan/analysis-ucl-study-finds-specific-genes-which-affect-learning-ability-downs-syndrome

    30 Jan 2020: Professors Matthew Walker and Elizabeth Fisher (UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology), write about their research, which has identified gene regions that cause memory and learning problems in mice with Down syndrome, and explain what insight this

    Professors Matthew Walker and Elizabeth Fisher (UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology), write about their research, which has identified gene regions that cause memory and learning problems in mice with Down syndrome, and explain what insight this provides the human condition.

  9. Novel insight into chromosome 21 and its effect on Down syndrome |…

    https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/2020/jan/novel-insight-chromosome-21-and-its-effect-down-syndrome

    29 Jan 2020: A UCL-led research team has, for the first time, identified specific regions of chromosome 21, which cause memory and decision-making problems in mice with Down syndrome, a finding that provides valuable new insight into the condition in humans. 

    A UCL-led research team has, for the first time, identified specific regions of chromosome 21, which cause memory and decision-making problems in mice with Down syndrome, a finding that provides valuable new insight into the condition in humans. 

  10. Scientists discover key to Iron Age ‘Heslington brain’ preservation | …

    https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/2020/jan/scientists-discover-key-iron-age-heslington-brain-preservation

    8 Jan 2020: The 2,600-year-old Heslington brain, discovered in 2008 near York in the UK, was probably so well-preserved due to tightly folded brain proteins, finds a new UCL-led study.

    The 2,600-year-old Heslington brain, discovered in 2008 near York in the UK, was probably so well-preserved due to tightly folded brain proteins, finds a new UCL-led study.

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